Bryan Hammer

The current musings of a product designer in upstate NY.
joshuakaufman:

“The right constraints can you lead you to your very best work. My favorite example? Dr. Seuss wrote The Cat in the Hat with only 236 different words, so his editor bet him he couldn’t write a book with only 50 different words. Dr. Seuss came back and won the bet with Green Eggs and Ham, one of the bestselling children’s books of all time.” - Austin Kleon

joshuakaufman:

“The right constraints can you lead you to your very best work. My favorite example? Dr. Seuss wrote The Cat in the Hat with only 236 different words, so his editor bet him he couldn’t write a book with only 50 different words. Dr. Seuss came back and won the bet with Green Eggs and Ham, one of the bestselling children’s books of all time.” - Austin Kleon

What color does that taste like?
Coke has made white cans for the holidays to help raise funds to protect the Polar bear and it’s habitat. Sounds like a great idea, I love seeing new packaging, especially from Coke because they do it so well. However, it seems some people have been confused, and I can understand that. Diet Coke is silver, these new cans are white with some silver. If I don’t have my handy fact sheet and I’m not paying attention I’d probably grab the wrong thing too. What I find interesting is that some customers “felt that regular Coke tasted different in the white cans.”  What?! Then I found this, but Coke released a statement and specifically addressed this claim:
There has been no change to the classic Coca-Cola formula that everyone knows and loves — it’s still the same great-tasting, refreshing Coke, but in a limited-edition white package.
I hope someone with more resources than I do turns this into a research paper. I’ve heard of colors affecting buying decisions, but taste? Do Pepsi and Coke taste different because one can is blue and the other is red?

What color does that taste like?

Coke has made white cans for the holidays to help raise funds to protect the Polar bear and it’s habitat. Sounds like a great idea, I love seeing new packaging, especially from Coke because they do it so well. However, it seems some people have been confused, and I can understand that. Diet Coke is silver, these new cans are white with some silver. If I don’t have my handy fact sheet and I’m not paying attention I’d probably grab the wrong thing too. What I find interesting is that some customers “felt that regular Coke tasted different in the white cans.”  What?! Then I found this, but Coke released a statement and specifically addressed this claim:

There has been no change to the classic Coca-Cola formula that everyone knows and loves — it’s still the same great-tasting, refreshing Coke, but in a limited-edition white package.

I hope someone with more resources than I do turns this into a research paper. I’ve heard of colors affecting buying decisions, but taste? Do Pepsi and Coke taste different because one can is blue and the other is red?

Pick One.
rosewong:

edrienne:

redpantsaddict:

My life.

NOPE.

Hahahahaha

Pick One.

rosewong:

edrienne:

redpantsaddict:

My life.

NOPE.

Hahahahaha

(via lauriebreaker)

Interesting take on getting the best medical attention. Does it help?
jayparkinsonmd:

I bet celebrities and other VIPs (as they’re known in hospitals) get some of the worst healthcare in America. And, when I mean worst, I mean the most.
I did my residency in the West Village in NYC. There seemed to be a new celebrity in the ER every other day. “Oh my god, Lindsay Lohan is in bed 3!” I took care of my fair share of them— I won’t say who. But there was always this understanding from everyone in the hospital that “they were VIPs” and needed extra special treatment. 
The problem with extra-special treatment in our healthcare system is that it almost always means more care than anyone else would get. For example, celebrities often get every test imaginable done on them in order to rule absolutely everything out. A hospital doesn’t want to be known as the one that killed Lindsay Lohan. This of course leads to more tests and sometimes, more procedures. More procedures can often equal more complications. You get the deal. One hundred thousand people in America die every year due to medical mistakes, unnecessary surgeries, hospital-acquired infections, and drug complications. And they’re not VIPs.
Everyone in the health community is speculating on what happened to Steve Jobs, so here’s the rough timeline:
Some time in the second half of 2003: Jobs undergoes some sort of scan which finds an incidentaloma, which actually later that evening, it was biopsied and found out to be a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, a slow growing kind of pancreatic cancer.
The next nine months: Jobs tries a special diet hoping to kill or slow the cancer’s growth. Either it doesn’t work and the cancer grows or the doctors convince Steve that there’s more evidence for a Western medicine intervention than a special diet.
July 31, 2004: Jobs undergoes surgery to remove the tumor.
June 2009: Jobs undergoes a liver transplant. It’s unclear why.
August 24, 2011. Jobs steps down as Apple’s CEO because he is unfit for his duties.
As a physician, it’s our job to do something. We can prescribe pills or we can perform some sort of procedure on you. When we find something abnormal, it’s in our nature to do something about it. Sometimes, it’s in your best interest to actually not do anything about it. The problem is, we don’t know when we should not do something because we don’t always know how you and your body will handle something abnormal. All we have are stats from population-level studies, an intuition, personal experience, and some labs or imaging. I learned from a professor in medical school that we all get cancer a few times a day. Out of tens of trillions of cells in our body, it makes sense that a few of them will occasionally go haywire. But, there are very elegant processes in our body that ensure these mutated cells actually kill themselves (see Knudson’s Hypothesis).
Steve Jobs’ had an incidentaloma. It may have taken this tumor 15 or 20 years to cause symptoms. However, it may have taken 1 month. We won’t ever know. We do know that incidentalomas sometimes simply go away without rhyme or reason. And we do know that, in Jobs’ case, the doctors intervened with two major surgeries and, now, 8 years later, his health is severely compromised. Maybe if his doctors actually did nothing for him, he’d still be just fine today. There’s no real way to know. I do think that his docs did the right thing as competent doctors, but, again, there’s no way to know if they were competent in Steve Jobs’ case nor will we ever know that if they just left him alone, he would have been just fine. He probably doesn’t have many years, if not months, to live. And that makes me very, very sad. He was one of our heroes. But I’ve got to wonder to myself, how were his doctors affected by the fact that they had Steve Jobs as a patient? We’ll, of course, never know. But I surely wouldn’t want to be his doctor.
For further reading, please read The Atlantic article, How American Healthcare Killed My Father.

Interesting take on getting the best medical attention. Does it help?

jayparkinsonmd:

I bet celebrities and other VIPs (as they’re known in hospitals) get some of the worst healthcare in America. And, when I mean worst, I mean the most.

I did my residency in the West Village in NYC. There seemed to be a new celebrity in the ER every other day. “Oh my god, Lindsay Lohan is in bed 3!” I took care of my fair share of them— I won’t say who. But there was always this understanding from everyone in the hospital that “they were VIPs” and needed extra special treatment. 

The problem with extra-special treatment in our healthcare system is that it almost always means more care than anyone else would get. For example, celebrities often get every test imaginable done on them in order to rule absolutely everything out. A hospital doesn’t want to be known as the one that killed Lindsay Lohan. This of course leads to more tests and sometimes, more procedures. More procedures can often equal more complications. You get the deal. One hundred thousand people in America die every year due to medical mistakes, unnecessary surgeries, hospital-acquired infections, and drug complications. And they’re not VIPs.

Everyone in the health community is speculating on what happened to Steve Jobs, so here’s the rough timeline:

  • Some time in the second half of 2003: Jobs undergoes some sort of scan which finds an incidentaloma, which actually later that evening, it was biopsied and found out to be a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, a slow growing kind of pancreatic cancer.
  • The next nine months: Jobs tries a special diet hoping to kill or slow the cancer’s growth. Either it doesn’t work and the cancer grows or the doctors convince Steve that there’s more evidence for a Western medicine intervention than a special diet.
  • July 31, 2004: Jobs undergoes surgery to remove the tumor.
  • June 2009: Jobs undergoes a liver transplant. It’s unclear why.
  • August 24, 2011. Jobs steps down as Apple’s CEO because he is unfit for his duties.

As a physician, it’s our job to do something. We can prescribe pills or we can perform some sort of procedure on you. When we find something abnormal, it’s in our nature to do something about it. Sometimes, it’s in your best interest to actually not do anything about it. The problem is, we don’t know when we should not do something because we don’t always know how you and your body will handle something abnormal. All we have are stats from population-level studies, an intuition, personal experience, and some labs or imaging. I learned from a professor in medical school that we all get cancer a few times a day. Out of tens of trillions of cells in our body, it makes sense that a few of them will occasionally go haywire. But, there are very elegant processes in our body that ensure these mutated cells actually kill themselves (see Knudson’s Hypothesis).

Steve Jobs’ had an incidentaloma. It may have taken this tumor 15 or 20 years to cause symptoms. However, it may have taken 1 month. We won’t ever know. We do know that incidentalomas sometimes simply go away without rhyme or reason. And we do know that, in Jobs’ case, the doctors intervened with two major surgeries and, now, 8 years later, his health is severely compromised. Maybe if his doctors actually did nothing for him, he’d still be just fine today. There’s no real way to know. I do think that his docs did the right thing as competent doctors, but, again, there’s no way to know if they were competent in Steve Jobs’ case nor will we ever know that if they just left him alone, he would have been just fine. He probably doesn’t have many years, if not months, to live. And that makes me very, very sad. He was one of our heroes. But I’ve got to wonder to myself, how were his doctors affected by the fact that they had Steve Jobs as a patient? We’ll, of course, never know. But I surely wouldn’t want to be his doctor.

For further reading, please read The Atlantic article, How American Healthcare Killed My Father.

cyclocosm:

fuckyeahcycling:

Tour de France 2011 | Stage 4
(via Le Tour De France’s Photos - Stage 4 - Lorient - Mûr de Bretagne)

God, what a finish. 

Amazing finish

cyclocosm:

fuckyeahcycling:

Tour de France 2011 | Stage 4

(via Le Tour De France’s Photos - Stage 4 - Lorient - Mûr de Bretagne)

God, what a finish. 

Amazing finish

I’m still amazed that this can happen, and I don’t know how it’s possible. For some reason the fast food industry is the only one that can advertise with pictures that make the product look like one thing, but then sell you something completely different, and everyone is fine with it. It’s like seeing an ad for a new 2011 Ford Mustang, going to buy it and having the dealer roll out a 1985 Tempo. Would you just get in and drive away?

jayparkinsonmd:

horaciogaray:

Fast Food – Ads vs. Reality

Haha…reminds me of the Happy Meal Project. By the way, doctor’s orders, don’t eat that.

I’m still amazed that this can happen, and I don’t know how it’s possible. For some reason the fast food industry is the only one that can advertise with pictures that make the product look like one thing, but then sell you something completely different, and everyone is fine with it. It’s like seeing an ad for a new 2011 Ford Mustang, going to buy it and having the dealer roll out a 1985 Tempo. Would you just get in and drive away?

jayparkinsonmd:

horaciogaray:

Fast Food – Ads vs. Reality

Haha…reminds me of the Happy Meal Project. By the way, doctor’s orders, don’t eat that.

jonathanflores:

Tour de France champion Alberto Contador has been suspended from cycling  for one year and stripped of his 2010 Tour de France victory, his  spokesperson announced Wednesday.
Disgrace.

More like Contadouche.

jonathanflores:

Tour de France champion Alberto Contador has been suspended from cycling for one year and stripped of his 2010 Tour de France victory, his spokesperson announced Wednesday.

Disgrace.

More like Contadouche.

bigringriding:

RIP JURE ‘ANIMAL’ ROBIC. 
FIVE-TIME RAAM WINNER, AND 24HR-RECORD HOLDER.
WHEN THE HALLUCINATIONS TOOK HOLD, THE FORMER SOLDIER USED TO TRY TO FIGHT THE SHADOWS - OR HIS SUPPORT TEAM, AS THEY FED HIS DELUSIONS OF PSYCHOPATHS IN THE WOODS TO MAKE HIM PEDAL FASTER.
ROBIC DIED TRAINING IN THE SLOVENIAN ALPS.
PHOTO SOURCE AND MORE INFO HERE.
THX @johnlaughlin FOR THE SPOT.


Sad news. I read this article a few years about about him and found new inspiration for those tough training days.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/05/sports/playmagazine/05robicpm.html?_r=3&pagewanted=all
Interesting story about a total freak, as well as how the human brain uses pain to try and tell us to stop when we can actually go twice as far as we think we can. So when you’re out there and you think you might die if you go any further stop being a pussy cause actually you can do twice as much.
RIP Animal

bigringriding:

RIP JURE ‘ANIMAL’ ROBIC. 

FIVE-TIME RAAM WINNER, AND 24HR-RECORD HOLDER.

WHEN THE HALLUCINATIONS TOOK HOLD, THE FORMER SOLDIER USED TO TRY TO FIGHT THE SHADOWS - OR HIS SUPPORT TEAM, AS THEY FED HIS DELUSIONS OF PSYCHOPATHS IN THE WOODS TO MAKE HIM PEDAL FASTER.

ROBIC DIED TRAINING IN THE SLOVENIAN ALPS.

PHOTO SOURCE AND MORE INFO HERE.

THX @johnlaughlin FOR THE SPOT.

Sad news. I read this article a few years about about him and found new inspiration for those tough training days.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/02/05/sports/playmagazine/05robicpm.html?_r=3&pagewanted=all

Interesting story about a total freak, as well as how the human brain uses pain to try and tell us to stop when we can actually go twice as far as we think we can. So when you’re out there and you think you might die if you go any further stop being a pussy cause actually you can do twice as much.

RIP Animal

heathershae:

lauriebreaker:

17polegadas:

tinyfactorygirl:

thephlipside




One of my favorite movies of all time.

heathershae:

lauriebreaker:

17polegadas:

tinyfactorygirl:

thephlipside

One of my favorite movies of all time.

From a profile of Usain Bolt

jakelodwick:

When he was younger, he says, the only thing he wanted to do was please everybody around him, from his fans to the media. But after his disastrous showing in Athens in 2004, Bolt sussed out the heartless calculus that underpins critical and public opinion: “I figured out that as long as you’re not doing good, they’re going to criticize you, and if you’re doing good, they’re going to love you.” The epiphany was a liberating one, in that it allowed him to disregard basically everything — from the dizzying adulation to the steroid speculation — that people have thrown at him since then. “I figured it out, and I was like, okay … I’ve gotta put me first. And then I just started enjoying it.”

(entire profile here at Esquire. Via Ronen)